The Miscellanian

Everything is miscellaneous.
Striped bodysuit for Aladdin Sane tour 1973. Design by Kansai Yamamoto. Photograph by Masayoshi Sukita.

Striped bodysuit for Aladdin Sane tour 1973. Design by Kansai Yamamoto. Photograph by Masayoshi Sukita.

Loved this eyeroll when the guy from A-Ha came out during the #BBMA.

Loved this eyeroll when the guy from A-Ha came out during the #BBMA.

As soon as you crack your knuckles and open up a comments page, you just canceled your subscription to being a good person.

—Louis C. K. (yes, again), in an interview with Dave Itzkoff for The New York Times. (via parislemon)

Lon Harris: The Harlem Shake and The Post-Meme Society

lons:

When we say something has become an “Internet meme,” we are either misusing or re-appropriating the word “meme” to mean something like “inside joke.” Most of our present-day memes - from “Grumpy Cat” to Gangnam Style - are really just references, and all you have to do to get the reference is keep…

We are now having a very innocent little chat. Let us suppose that there is a bomb underneath this table between us. Nothing happens, and then all of a sudden, "Boom!" There is an explosion. The public is surprised, but prior to this surprise, it has seen an absolutely ordinary scene of no special consequence. Now, let us take a suspense situation. The bomb is underneath the table and the public knows it, probably because they have seen the anarchist place it there. The public is aware that the bomb is going to explode at one o’clock and there is a clock in the decor. The public can see that it is a quarter to one. In these conditions this same innocuous conversation becomes fascinating because the public is participating in the scene. The audience is longing to warn the characters on the screen: "You shouldn’t be talking about such trivial matters. There’s a bomb beneath you and it’s about to explode!" In the first scene we have given the public fifteen seconds of surprise at the moment of the explosion. In the second we have provided them with fifteen minutes of suspense. The conclusion is that whenever possible the public must be informed. Except when the surprise is a twist, that is, when the unexpected ending is, in itself, the highlight of the story.

—Qtd. in Francois Truffaut, Hitchcock, rev. ed. (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1984), 73.

explore-blog:

In 1961, Playboy assembled some of the greatest designers in America for this spread. From left to right: George Nelson, Edward Wormley, Eero Saarinen, Harry Bertoia, Charles Eames, and Jens Risom.

explore-blog:

In 1961, Playboy assembled some of the greatest designers in America for this spread. From left to right: George Nelson, Edward Wormley, Eero Saarinen, Harry Bertoia, Charles Eames, and Jens Risom.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

404 Error. Not Found. #Teo

404 Error. Not Found. #Teo

deepfocusholiday:


THE QUOTABLE KUATO
If this was a real gift (what a world it would be if it was!), it would cost about $25.
 
So if you like this gift, why not donate $25 to help those affected by Hurricane Sandy.

deepfocusholiday:

THE QUOTABLE KUATO

If this was a real gift (what a world it would be if it was!), it would cost about $25.
 
So if you like this gift, why not donate $25 to help those affected by Hurricane Sandy.